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Taking Media Monitoring International

August 2nd, 2016 Posted by Blog No Comment yet

I have been working with international media monitoring and analysis projects in Opoint for 5 years now, everything from small temporary projects in one or two countries to large multinational companies monitoring and analyzing their content from 50 countries. Regardless of the scope of the project, there are quite many aspects in common, which can be good to bear in mind if you are thinking of taking it international.

 

International monitoring has borders and should therefore be specified to certain countries. Very often we get requests from clients who want to monitor international content, without describing exact countries, or even languages. They want to be more aware of what is being published about their brand, but they don’t know how to limit it. Usually the budget is a good guideline and after some initial discussions we often figure out that we should start off with the most important markets. Usually the most interesting market is where the brand is active in some way and can expect publicity.

 

There are some tools out there that give access to “everything”, but they are very limited in the size of the media list and often focused on a specific topic, such as Factiva database for financial news. If you want access to a bigger medialist, and are interested in both daily nationals, regionals and trade magazines, you will need the traditional media monitoring services we offer through our network with other media monitoring companies in each single country. The startup process is therefore slightly more complicated, as we need to explain our need to each single supplier, which will in the end assure a better result as the local companies have the best knowledge of how the keywords should be monitored.

 

International monitoring is often protected by copyright and require specific licenses which need to be signed. Countries that are somewhat more complicated are for example UK and Germany where we need to know the number of readers within the organization – as the copyright price is set upon that.

 

Retrieving international print content is complicated and not every country is able to deliver digitally. Even though pdf-s has become more of a standard, there are still plenty of countries unable to deliver digitally, due to copyright laws or technical reasons. Most countries in Europe send pdf-s, but Finland for example still work with printouts sent by post.

 

The price for print monitoring is derived from the specific countries and the amount of publicity. The more countries you want to monitor, the bigger the basic fee is. Additionally, we pay fees per article, so the more mentions you have, the more expensive it gets. We usually make an estimate together with the supplier, and set the price based on that. International web content however, is easy and much cheaper in comparison – so it is a good place to start with a small budget.

 

Although international print monitoring is more complex than Nordic monitoring, we have a wide network and long experience, enabling us to find the right scope and price quite fast. Setting up the monitoring and starting to receive the content will not take more than a few days, and can also be tested for a shorter period of time. We can also send you samples of articles if you want to see how the content is presented, before you make up your mind. Content can be collected into our online tool and mobile application so that you have all your relevant content in one place.

 

Taking your media monitoring outside national borders can give your organization new insights which will benefit your marketing. Contact us if you want to learn more about your brand internationally.

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